Saturday, January 1, 2011

TUTORIAL: Twenties Hat

Why? Because I want to know if I can. That's the driving force behind much of my crochet designing. I wanted a very elegant, classic Twenties cloche hat and I couldn't find a pattern for one - so I made one up. Here you go:

Materials
You need a
3.50mm hook (a ‘E’ hook)
approx. 90g sock yarn (or fingering weight cotton)
Note: this pattern uses American terms, the British terms are in [brackets].


The crown:
Start by chaining 3 and join with a slip stitch to form a little circle.
OR: start with a magic loop (thanks to Carla for pointing it out!)
If you have never crocheted a hat before, have a look at the pattern for the SiSoYa hat HERE. This includes some photos to help you along.


Round 1: Chain one, then do a SC [DC] in the same stitch below (this counts as your first SC [DC] here and throughout), then do 9 SC (DC) into the circle. Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch. (10 stitches in total)
Round 2: Chain one, then do 2 SC [DC] in the same stitch. 2 SC [DC] in next nine stitches. Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch. (20 stitches in total)
Round 3: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in next nineteen stitches. Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch. (20 stitches in total)
Round 4: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch, *1 SC [DC] in next stitch, 2 SC [DC] in stitch after. Repeat from * around, ending with 2 SC [DC]. Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch. (30 stitches in total)
Round 5: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in next twenty-nine stitches. Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch. (30 stitches in total)
Round 6: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in next stitch, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch, *1 SC [DC] in next two stitches, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch. Repeat from * around, ending with 2 SC [DC]. Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch. (40 stitches in total)
Round 7: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in next thirty-nine stitches. Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch. (40 stitches in total)
Round 8: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in next stitch, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch, *1 SC [DC] in next three stitches, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch. Repeat from * around, ending with 2 SC [DC]. Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch. (50 stitches in total)

From this point on, you increase in every second round (the even-numbered rounds.) You increase by adding one more SC [DC] between every double SC [DC] in every round. In other words, in round 8, you do one SC [DC] in three stitches between each double SC [DC]; in round 10, you’ll do one SC [DC] in four stitches between your doubles. Every second round (the uneven-numbered rounds) will simply be a SC [DC] in each stitch.

You continue to increase like this until you have a slightly-curling circle (it will probably be like a woolly saucer) that has a diametre of a bit more than 18 cm / 7 inches. (Mine was 7.25 inches when I stopped.) If you have a big head or a lot of hair, make the crown a bit bigger. It's supposed to fit snugly but you don't want it to cut off the blood circulation to your brain.


The body of the hat:
Now keep crocheting in the round - no more increases, just one SC [DC] in every stitch, till the hat is approximately 18 cm / 7 inches from the crown of the hat to the brim (bottom edge). When you pop the hat on your head, the brim (bottom edge) ought to sit at eyebrow level.

The brim:
In order to achieve the gently-sloping brim of a Twenties-style hat, you have to increase very gradually. These values are approximate and are meant as a guideline:


BrimRd1: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in next 29 stitches, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch *1 SC [DC] in next thirty stitches, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch. Repeat from * around. You mightn't finish neatly with 2 SC [DC] as you did when you were crocheting the crown - don't worry. If I reach the end of the round after, say, 26 SC [DC] then I do 2 SC [DC] in the last stitch. If I reach the end of the round after 10 SC [DC] then I don't. It's all about spacing your 2 SC [DC] as evenly as you can. . Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch.
BrimRd2-6: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in each stitch all round. . Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch. (= five rows of single SC [DC] )

BrimRd7: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in next 39 stitches, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch *1 SC [DC] in next forty stitches, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch. Repeat from * around. Again, you mightn't finish neatly with a 2 SC [DC] but you can use your discretion and add a 2 SC [DC] in the last stitch if you wish. . Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch.
BrimRd8-12: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in each stitch all round. (= five rows of single SC [DC] ) Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch.

BrimRd13: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in next 34 stitches, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch *1 SC [DC] in next thirty-five stitches, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch. Repeat from * around.
BrimRd14-16: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in each stitch all round. (= three rows of single SC [DC] )

BrimRd17: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in next 34 stitches, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch *1 SC [DC] in next thirty-five stitches, 2 SC [DC] in next stitch. Repeat from * around. . Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch.
BrimRd18-20: Chain one, then do 1 SC [DC] in the same stitch, 1 SC [DC] in each stitch all round. (= three rows of single SC [DC] ) . Join the last stitch to the first stitch of the row with a slip stitch.

Your brim should now have a gentle slope like this, low enough to come down over your eyes so you can flutter your peepers beguilingly at passers-by. Try it on again and again as you crochet, so you stop at the length that suits you. Mine is very low but you might prefer yours a little shorter.




Shaping:
In order to help this hat keep its shape, it's not a bad idea to stiffen it a little. I wet mine with warm water (not hot - we don't want it to felt) using a spray bottle. I then placed it on top of my Styrofoam model's head and pulled it into shape. It didn't require much shaping, mind you, as the SC [DC] and thin yarn mean that the hat already maintains its shape reasonably well. I sprayed it with some spray starch (available in the laundry section of your local supermarket) and blow-dried it using a warm setting on the hair-drier. The hat isn't stiff (I used very little starch) but it keeps its basic shape when I put it on and take it off - which is what I wanted. More information about stiffening crochet here.

If you don't have a Styrofoam head (and I admit that this is not the kind of item knocking around most households), you could look for a simple alternative. Before I had mine, I used an upside-down breakfast bowl on a candlestick or my husband's volleyball. Essentially anything with a rounded shape to allow the hat to dry on would do the trick.


Decorating:
This is the bit I like best and it's amazing how the hat changes character depending on the ribbons and embellishments you pin on it:





You may not reproduce this pattern in print or claim it as your work. You may not sell the pattern. Do not copy and paste pattern to another website, please use a link. You can make these hats for your personal use, for gifts and to sell privately (e.g. at craft fairs or markets.) I would kindly request that you give me credit for the pattern on your product tag with a link to my website - 'cause that's the decent thing to do and we crafters are decent people. And, obviously, if you make millions from making these hats, you have to give me a significant share.
 
A PDF of this pattern can be made at THIS website: just copy and paste this link
http://gingerschatz.blogspot.com/2011/01/tutorial-twenties-hat.html
and it prepares a perfect PDF, ready for print!

25 comments:

Emily said...

I LOVE it, beautiful shape! And particularly like the embellishments!!

Debi Y. said...

It's lovely - thanks for sharing your pattern. Have a Happy New Year. :)

Gracey is not my name.... said...

Very nice!

Cris said...

I really like this hat - I'm going to have to add it to my list of things to make in 2011. Thanks for sharing!

Paul & Carla said...

You are a talented designer. Absolutely. I must ask you, though, if you have ever started small circles with the magic loop method? I may very well make your marvelous and elegant hat but would take off with a M.L. rather than a chain of 3. Just sayin'.

The Gingerbread Lady said...

Carla, you're a star: I really meant to link to a magic loop method. I've used it and I like the results, but it's a bit too fiddly for my flying fingers. You're right, though, it's a neater start for a hat.
I hope 2011 has been treating you well so far!

Aeshna said...

You are genious! This hat is perfect! Thank you for sharing it:):):)

Clara said...

I love this! Thank you for sharing. Please have a wonderful year ahead!

Paul & Carla said...

Hmmmm... to me magic loop is a pretty slick and easy method although I admit I kind of had to get used to it; I do like the way it looks very much. To each his own!

The Gingerbread Lady said...

Carla - one word: laziness. It's just easier for me to start off with a familiar method, when I should make an effort to master a new one. Oh well, maybe 2011 should be the year of the magic loop!

JJCrochet (Jayna) said...

That's beautiful - so bright and colorful! Where did you get the flower in the last picture? Did you make it yourself?

The Gingerbread Lady said...

Hello Jayna,
Thank you for your comment!
I didn't make the flower - it was a present from my sister and made by Applique Originals (www.appliqueoriginals.co.uk)

Yarn Crazy Girl said...

I love this hat! What brand of yarn did you use??

The Gingerbread Lady said...

Hi YarnCrazyGirl - thank you for your comment!
This is an ancient skein of black sock yarn - plain black, 75% wool/25% nylon. It's probably about 20 years old and was given to me by a destashing friend, the brand is Mercato (haven't seen it in any shops in recent years).
Essentially, sock yarn works well because it's warm, though thin. You could also try a mercerised cotton. I believe - I'm not an expert - that these natural fibres stiffen better.

Paul & Carla said...

I was looking at this again to maybe make it for a friend who is going to need chemo hats. G-Lady, am I missing the gauge? I looked over it a couple of times... (Having been burned this way more than once I reluctantly decided to ask about it. I hope you don't think me a nag!)

The Gingerbread Lady said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
The Gingerbread Lady said...

Lady

Blogger The Gingerbread Lady said...

Hello Carla,
Please feel free to nag :-)

Based on the hat I've done, my stitch gauge is 7 SC/1 inch & 9 rows/1 inch. This seems standard with all the sock yarn hats I do, 7 SC/inch, though the rows vary according to how 'nubbly' the yarn is (sometimes 8 or 10 rows per inch)

However, this can vary slightly because more decisive is the diameter of the crown, which you might achieve in fewer/more rows that I do, depending on how tightly you crochet. The average woman's head is 21,5 inches and the crown is this number divided by Pi ... or, simply, divided by 3 (= a little more than 7 inches.) After that, you just continue crocheting in the round without increases, till it reaches approximately to your eyebrows, at which point you gently increase again. The only reason I'm using such thin yarn is because I have more control over the amount I increase/decrease, I can create a better shape for the brim if I'm only increasing minimally with each row.

I hope this helps!

Paul & Carla said...

Definitely it does. I am a tad small and through the years have rejected many hat purchases because they were too big. In one shop the owner was a tall, statuesque lady and ALL her hats were enormous on me — bought, no doubt, to fit her! These crocheted (or knitted) hats like yours typically have some stretch.

Susie Little said...

Beautiful!

lovecrochet said...

Hi I 'm just wondering what you mean by: "Chain one, then do a SC [DC] in the same stitch below Do you mean a slip stitch? When I have crocheted in rounds that what I am used to doing to move on to the next row just want some clarification thanks!

The Gingerbread Lady said...

When you come to the end of the row, you join the last stitch to the first stitch of this round or row with a slip stitch. Then you chain one, and do a SC[Dc] into the first stitch of the previous row and this is the start of the new row. As you are working in rounds, I took it as a given that you would join the last stitch to the first stitch with a slip stitch, but have added it to the pattern for clarification!

This (chain one, SC) is an alternative to starting a new row of SC[DC]s with two chain. The one chain gives you a little bit of yarn to maneouver with and then you simply SC[DC] your first stitch. Otherwise the first stitch of each row looks a bit skinny.

Hope this helps!

lovecrochet said...

Thank you!

The Gingerbread Lady said...

You're welcome - and thank you for letting me know. Sometimes the things you overlook or leave out are the things you think are most "obvious" (but, of course, they're not ...)

artede said...

I love the hat. I'll try it for my daughter with matching flower in her school uniform. Thank you very much for the pattern.

cristina said...

I've just pinned it: http://pinterest.com/pin/2674081001830151/

thank you for the pattern, you are the best!